About Memory

Therapy and Lifestyle Changes

There is no one magic pill that a person can take to prevent or cure memory loss. But the combination of several therapies and lifestyle changes that are balanced in safety and science may yield the most benefit. For some tips on boosting Brain Power - Click Here

Overview of Alzheimer's disease

Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is a condition where an individual will progressively lose their memory and thinking skills. Oftentimes, patients will attribute these cognitive changes to a part of the normal aging process. However, as time goes on, short-term memory declines and the most common problems include loss of orientation (e.g., not knowing the date), difficulty with communication (e.g., finding the correct words to say), changes in behavior, and impaired judgment. Some examples of memory loss include continually losing things, like keys or a cell phone. Misplacing objects, forgetting appointments, and repeating the same things over and over again are also common symptoms, which may be related to memory and/or concentration.


The first observable signs of AD may not actually be memory loss, but may instead be a depressed mood, a loss of interest in pleasurable activities, a change in personality, increasing anxiety, or even a change in sleep patterns. It is highly advisable for any of these symptoms to seek medical attention by a qualified medical professional when symptoms first begin. A variety of specialists can be called upon to perform an evaluation, including primary care doctors (e.g., internist or family doctor), neurologists, geriatric psychiatrists, or geriatricians (who specialize in the care of patients aged 65 and over). In general, the earlier someone is diagnosed, the earlier the treatment can start, and the earlier that treatment begins, the better they will do.

Signs of Alzheimer's

The first observable signs of AD may not actually be memory loss, but may instead be a depressed mood, a loss of interest in pleasurable activities, a change in personality, increasing anxiety, or even a change in sleep patterns. It is highly advisable for any of these symptoms to seek medical attention by a qualified medical professional when symptoms first begin. A variety of specialists can be called upon to perform an evaluation, including primary care doctors (e.g., internist or family doctor), neurologists, geriatric psychiatrists, or geriatricians (who specialize in the care of patients aged 65 and over). In general, the earlier someone is diagnosed, the earlier the treatment can start, and the earlier that treatment begins, the better they will do.


Video of the Month: Learn the difference between 'normal' age-related memory loss and something more serious, like Alzheimer's disease